Homerton Hospital to open new Sickle Cell day care centre

After years of planning, Thursday 18 October sees the opening of a day care centre at Homerton Hospital for sufferers of both Sickle Cell Anemia and Thassalmania.

It’s the most serious of inherited conditions in the UK, yet it is the least known about and Homerton Hospital already manages over 300 local patients with the condition, while providing advice and support for those who aren’t themselves affected but ‘carry’ the condition, and could pass it on to their children.  In England alone, there are approximately 12,500 people who suffer from this disease and an estimated 240,000 carriers of sickle cell in England

Sickle Cell Disease  also known as Sickle Cell Anemia and Thalassemia, is  a blood disorder passed down through families and predominately affects people of African, Caribbean and Mediterranean heritage.

Consultant Haematologist Dr Roger Amos said: “Sickle cell disease and Thalassaemia are common problems in our local community and patients are frequent users of our health care services. Homerton is committed to providing first class care for patients with these disorders. The new expanded day care facility offers immediate access to expert doctors and nurses, together with all the other innovations which have been put in place over the past 12 months.

“These include a psychology and social care liaison service, together with equipment to deliver efficient automated red cell exchange blood transfusions which, I believe, will make a global impact on our patients’ quality of life.”

Dr Amos added: “Homerton has for some years provided limited day care but the new expanded Day Centre, with its philosophy of seeing and treating people rapidly, avoiding where possible admission to hospital, and helping those affected to be more in control of their lives will, we truly hope, make a big difference for our patients.”

A hospital spokes person said “The Day Centre will operate from 9am to 7pm and patients registered with the hospital can come directly to the Centre as soon as they suspect a problem. The Centre offers powerful pain relief, oxygen therapy and intravenous therapy”.

As well as medical and nursing care, the team also offers counseling and psychological support, advice and help about employment and applications for welfare benefits, and assistance with specific housing needs.

Earlier this year the Homerton Hospital University Trust showed interest in buying the same disused toilet block on Brooksby Walk that a Clapton social enterprise group were interested in.  It now appears they may have put it on back burners. A spokesperson for the Trust told Hackney Hive: “Homerton has decided not to pursue the Brooksby Walk toilets project at the moment, and will be focusing sickle cell services at the new sickle cell day centre at the hospital”.

 

About Remi

Remi Hackney Hive founder, publisher and contributor. Hackneyite and all round Girl Friday, who couldn't wait to leave Hackney and London behind her. After hitching her wagon in California, Texas, New Orleans, Louisiana for 18 years, with a brief spell in Mexico, the prodigal daughter returned, happy to put an unconventional and risqué past behind her. She is owned by her two dogs Deffer(a Jack Russell & Darcy a Jack Russell/Pomeranian mix) and runs a London based pet sitting business. The big smoke is home for the moment, but she desperately yearns wide open spaces, where she hopes to call home in the near future.

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